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Lung Cancer Treatment - Palliative and End-of-Life Care

Advanced Cancer and Palliative Care: Treatment Guidelines for Patients (National Comprehensive Cancer Network)
Comprehensive patient guidelines established by the NCCN and the American Cancer Society to address the issues related to palliative and end-of-life care for people with cancer and their families. Provides tools for assessing palliative care needs, symptoms, treatment options, advance care planning, sources of social support, complex care arrangement, specialized care during the final days and care for the family and caregiver after death. Additional topics include: what is palliative care, hospice care, cost of care, support for others, facing death, and grieving the loss of a loved one. [12/03]

Palliative Care (CHEST)
Abstract of the evidence-based lung cancer treatment guideline published by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) in the supplement to the January 2003 issue of CHEST. The majority of patients who acquire lung cancer will have troublesome symptoms at some time during the course of their disease. Some of the symptoms are common to many types of cancers, while others are more often encountered with lung cancer than other primary sites. The most common symptoms are pain, dyspnea, and cough. Discusses the management of these symptoms, and it will also address the palliation of specific problems that are commonly seen in lung cancer: metastases to the brain, spinal cord, and bones; hemoptysis; tracheoesophageal fistula; and obstruction of the superior vena cava. Additional recommendations and assessments are included. Aimed at physicians. [1/03]

End-of-life Care (CHEST)
Abstract of the evidence-based lung cancer treatment guideline published by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) in the supplement to the January 2003 issue of CHEST. Notes that there has been increasing concern in attaining control of the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual distress of the patient and family. Stresses that communication between the doctor, patient, and family is central to the care of patients with disease that is not responsive to curative treatment and that the advanced care directive protects patient autonomy. Symptomatic and supportive care provided in a timely and consistent fashion in the hospice environment, which treats the patient and family at home, has been increasingly used, and at this time is the best model for end-of-life care in the United States. Additional recommendations and assessments are included. Aimed at physicians. [1/03]



 

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